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Remixed Straight Dough

The idea of remixing straight dough in a stand mixer came to me after reading a description of a “modified re-mixed straight dough system” in Baking Science and Technology by E. J. Pyler(1). Pyler's account is based on a description of the “ful-flavor process” by L.F. Marnett (2). The process is summarized below:

  • A high speed vertical mixer with round mixing bowls is used.

  • The caster mounted mixing bowls have a capacity of 600 pounds, and serve as fermentation vessels.

  • All of the ingredients (except salt and sugar) are mixed at high speed for less than one minute.

  • After a fermentation period of 2½ hours, the salt and sugar are added and the dough is remixed to attain full gluten development (3.5 minutes at high speed).

  • The fully developed dough is given a “floor time” (rest period) of 15 to 20 minutes, after which the dough is moulded and panned.



With a few modifications, the ful-flavor process can be adapted for home use. The highlights of this “miniaturized modified re-mixed straight dough system” are listed below:

  • A stand mixer with planetary gear action is used.

  • The mixing bowl also serves as a fermentation vessel.

  • All of the ingredients (except salt and sugar) are mixed at low speed for 4 to 6 minutes.

  • After a fermentation period of 2½ hours, the salt and sugar are added and the dough is remixed to attain full gluten development (speeds and times depend on mixer design and style of dough hook).

  • The fully developed dough is rounded and allowed to rest for a short period (5-8 minutes) before being moulded and panned.



One advantage of remixing is the elimination of all punching, folding, and stretching of the dough. This is especially helpful in the production of whole wheat dough, which does not take punishment well. Re-mixed dough (both white and whole wheat) emerges with a fully developed gluten network, which a stand mixer normally cannot produce. Re-mixed straight doughs are elastic, extensible, and plastic. They exhibit superior gas retention and take a big spring in the oven.

The remix process requires the use of “strong” flour, which usually means a high protein content. Strong flour produces bread with greater volume when compared to weaker varieties. Flour strength can be improved by the addition of vital wheat gluten, which is necessary to produce whole wheat bread of acceptable volume.



(1) Pyler, E. J. Baking Science and Technology, Second Edition, Volume 2, page 594 (1982)

(2) Marnett, L. F. The ful-flavor process... theory and practice. Baker's Digest 33 (4) 54-58 (1959).



Copyright 2014 by R. L. Saussele



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